THOSE WHO SEEK TO CROSS HAVE FOUND A MEANS TO PASS



            As long as there have been borders, there have been governments seeking to control them, and people who will attempt to circumvent that control. As nations gain or lose land through war or treaty, these shifting borders frequently cut across formerly united communities, forever changing their social and cultural landscapes. The US-Mexico border is the most heavily trafficked national boundary on the planet, with around 350 million documented crossings each year, and with 851,508 apprehensions by Border Patrol of undocumented crossers in 2019 alone. This partition has evolved into one of the most heavily patrolled and closely surveilled stretches of land in the world. Despite this extreme level of federal oversight, inefficient government policies, paired with the desire of individuals to cross have obfuscated any security measure introduced. Indigenous groups, cattle rustlers, cartels, and migrants alike have found ways to bypass the increasingly visible line in the sand drawn from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean. But here in the Atascosa Highlands, the greatest obstacle to unregulated crossing has always been the challenging terrain of the landscape itself.







Mark